Distinguishing different classes of secondary relaxations from vapour deposited ultrastable glasses

Secondary relaxations persistent in the glassy state after structural arrest are especially relevant for the properties of the glass. A major thrust in research in dynamics of glass-forming liquids is to identify what secondary relaxations exhibit a connection to the structural relaxation and are hence more relevant. Via the Coupling Model, secondary relaxations having such connection have Read more about Distinguishing different classes of secondary relaxations from vapour deposited ultrastable glasses[…]

Secondary relaxation in ultrastable etoricoxib: evidence of correlation with structural relaxation

Secondary relaxations are fundamental for their impact in the properties of glasses and for their inseparable connection to the structural relaxation. Understanding their density dependence and aging behavior is key to fully address the nature of glasses. Ultrastable glasses establish a new benchmark to study the characteristics of secondary relaxations, since their enthalpy and density Read more about Secondary relaxation in ultrastable etoricoxib: evidence of correlation with structural relaxation[…]

Why is surface diffusion the same in ultrastable, ordinary, aged, and ultrathin molecular glasses?

Recently Fakhraai and coworkers measured surface diffusion in ultrastable glass produced by vapor deposition, ordinary glass with and without physical aging, and ultrathin films of the same molecular glass-former, N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD). Diffusion on the surfaces of all these glasses is greatly enhanced compared with the bulk diffusion similar to that previously found by others, but remarkably Read more about Why is surface diffusion the same in ultrastable, ordinary, aged, and ultrathin molecular glasses?[…]